Jolie Jones – My EMF Story

It’s been another good week for environmental sensitivities in the media.  Jolie Jones, daughter of Quincy Jones, was interviewed by Lloyd Burrell of ElectricSense about her struggle with electromagnetic (EMF) sensitivities.  Kudos to Ms. Jones for speaking out about this often misunderstood condition and for having the courage to share her own story. Celebrity spokespeople are invaluable in helping to bring awareness and credibility to environmental illnesses like chemical and EMF sensitivities. 

Jolie Jones – My EMF Story

Posted by Lloyd Burrell on February 20, 2018 under Podcasts & Teleseminars

ElectricSense, www.electricsense.com/13519/emf-jolie-jones

 “It started kind of out of nowhere”.  Not exactly overnight but over the course of a few weeks or so.

She began to have these sensations behind her head like a vibration going from the bottom of her skull to the top.

Then there were the feelings of cloudiness, fogginess, like a big cloud was coming in the side of her temples pushing down on her brain.

She couldn’t think. She was in a permanent fog. She was also getting a lot of joint pain. There were different reactions to different exposures. Sometimes she would get heart palpitations. Sometimes she would get these pains in her joints and headaches, and a foggy kind of pressure on her brain. “It was like I became this little old lady”.

She admits to being impossible to be around. She didn’t even want to be herself. She’d have moments where she was fine but when she was around other people and someone had a cell phone on she would crumble into the nervous, anxious little old lady. “Where is it coming from? How do I get away from it? Can you turn it off?”

These were the questions she was continually asking herself and asking to other people. It was really debilitating.

For 4 years she couldn’t use a cell phone and she couldn’t be in a car with a cell phone. She had to literally take the battery out – yes, she could even feel it when it was turned off. She could point to someone’s pocket and tell them where the waves were coming from. People would say, “oh no, I turned my phone off.” She would say, “no, it’s still on. I promise you.” She’d point to where it was and they’d look in their pocket and then they’d look at her like she was a witch because the phone would be on.

She’d be driving on the road and all of a sudden she’d feel this vibration on the side of her head. She’d look for where it was coming from and she’d look up and discover that she was driving parallel to a row of power lines or something.…..

Healing was a major struggle, “it was like moving the Titanic” she says. Thankfully she did heal. She has now recovered her health and is able to function normally again.

Calvin Klein’s Runway Highlights Multiple Chemical Sensitivity

A most surprising thing happened at New York Fashion Week show this year. The Calvin Klein designer used MCS protective clothing as one of his inspirations for his collection. Those of us with chemical sensitivities have always known we were ahead of our time in recognizing the chemical soup we increasingly are living in, but I have to admit I didn’t expect we would be recognized as fashion forward as well! And how ironic to have Calvin Klein be inspired by MCS while at the same time selling a lucrative line of perfumes and cologne which are the bane of our existence!

Calvin Klein’s runway highlights Multiple Chemical Sensitivity disorder.. What is it?

Julie Tong Yahoo Lifestyle, February 15, 2018

A controversial disease known as Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) has become an unlikely point of inspiration for Raf Simons, the creative mind behind Calvin Klein.

During his Tuesday New York Fashion Week show, Simons referenced the 1995 Todd Haynes film Safe, which stars Julianne Moore as Carol. The main character becomes a victim in her own home and the world around her. She is, in short, allergic to her own life, as she begins to develop mysterious symptoms — mystery bleeding, fatigue, and weight loss — all inexplicable to doctors. As Carol becomes increasingly curious about what is causing her pain, she suspects the environment and starts wearing long sleeves and a balaclava to stay protected.

This week, Simons used Carol’s protective “fashion choice” as one of several inspirations for his runway collection — which similarly includes a series of balaclavas (hand-knit), thick white and metallic gloves, thigh-high boots, and protective clothing similar to a firefighter’s bunker gear. Jackets and coats are made in a bright safety orange, include reflective paneling along the sleeves and trimming.. One look, featuring a white, green, and red striped sweater with blue sleeves, white trousers, and orange balaclava, bears a striking resemblance to the film’s own promotional imagery of Carol in her protective outfit.

According to Vogue U.K., “Raf defined his work as being a mix of ‘safety and protection’ with a lot of cinematic historical references. They included Safe, the Julianne Moore film of 1995 about environmental illness in California and a new age clinic in Mexico…” While Raf’s show notes chose to explain his creative references with a collection of 50 words, they included “safe,” “environment,” “industrial,” and “uniform.”

But what is MCS, anyway? The disease rose to prominence during the 1980s and was used to describe chemically intolerant patients — those who are unusually, severely sensitive to common chemicals, solvents, and pollutants that are typically not considered harmful to the general public. Examples include diesel exhaust, smoke, fragrances, cleaning products, and even new carpets and fresh ink.

It differs from traditional allergies in its “symptoms and mechanisms,” according to Ann McCampbell, MD, who suffers from the illness and describes it on the website of the nonprofit Chemical Sensitivity Foundation. She explains how the reactions can be as severe as creating an “imbalance in a person’s nervous, immune, and endocrine (hormonal) systems” and forcing sufferers to pare down their diets to just a few select foods. It is also possible to develop difficulty in speech or cognitive ability. Exposure from cell phones, computers, fluorescent lights, and other wireless devices are believed to affect those with MCS, with the triggers and its reactions varying widely.

To see the full article and view the runway photos, go to:

https://finance.yahoo.com/photos/calvin-kleins-runway-highlights-multiple-slideshow-wp-185836466/

Pyrethroids & Deltamethrin Not Safe

Yesterday, I submitted comments to EPA on its Cumulative Risk Assessment of Pyrethrins/Pyrethroids which they claim confirms the safety of their present uses and supports consideration of new uses.  Comments can be submitted until Feb 3, 2012.  See http://www.epa.gov/oppfead1/cb/csb_page/updates/2011/pyrethrins.html

COMMENT:

Expanding the uses of pyrethroid pesticides is a terrible idea.  They are already used almost everywhere and are NOT the “kinder gentler” alternative to organophosphate pesticides that some claim.  Deltamethrin, in particular, is extremely toxic, especially to those who become sensitized to it, and it lasts almost forever.  I lost my house and most of my belongings after a housemate tracked in some deltamethrin.  

Restaurants, stores, hotels, movie theaters and other public places are increasingly sprayed with deltamethrin, effectively rendering them permanent toxic waste dumps.  Yes, pyrethroids have the same toxic mechanism of action and yes, they are toxic, and yes, exposures to them add up.  

At a time when we should be aggressively eliminating pesticide use and promoting integrated pest management (IPM) – with a focus on prevention and less-toxic pest control methods – this report is a huge step in the wrong direction.  If the driving force behind this terrible plan is to allow more use of pesticides in hotels/motels to control bed bugs, then the EPA must have missed the part about how pesticides are not very effective against bed bugs, while pesticides can harm people.

Once again, aggressive promotion of less-toxic control methods is in order, not slathering the world with more pesticides.  I am disappointed the EPA would even consider such a futile, harmful, and ridiculous plan.  Approved uses of pyrethroid pesticides should be reduced, not increased, and deltamethrin should be banned.

Ann McCampbell, MD

 

Help When You Need It From Someone Who Understands

Welcome to my new website letting you know I do phone consultations, medical legal work, and sell a Multiple Chemical Sensitivity (MCS) booklet.  For the first time, I have also collected and posted my most significant articles, writings, and publications, including “MCS Under Siege” and the NM MCS brochure.  On this blog, I plan to post tips, thoughts, and news updates of interest to people with chemical sensitivity, electromagnetic sensitivity, and other environmental illnesses.

Dr. Ann

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